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Dr Jeffery Webber, BA (McGill), MA (McGill), PhD (Toronto)

Jeffery

Senior Lecturer

Email: j.r.webber@qmul.ac.uk
Telephone: 020 7882 8592
Room Number: Arts One, 2.30B

Profile

Office Hours: Tuesday 2-3pm & Wednesday 10-11am

Prior to joining Queen Mary in 2010, Dr Jeffery R Webber declined a post-doctoral fellowship from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada to take up a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Political Science at the University of Regina, Canada, where he taught in 2009.  He has also been a Visiting Research Fellow at the Facultad Latinoamericano  de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO) in Quito, Ecuador, the Centro de Estudios para el Desarrollo Laboral y Agrario (CEDLA) and Centro Boliviano de Estudios Multidisicplinarios (CEBEM) in La Paz, Bolivia, and the International Institute for Research and Education in Amsterdam.

Over the last few years, he has been invited to speak on Latin American Politics, international relations, and social theory at a number of universities across Europe, North America, and Latin America, including Oxford University, Harvard University, University of California at Berkeley, New York University, Johns Hopkins University, University of Pittsburgh, Istanbul University, the New University of Lisbon, the University of Sussex, FLACSO (Ecuador), UNAM (Mexico), and the University of Toronto.

Dr Webber's PhD is from the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto, where he held an Ontario Graduate Scholarship and an International Development Research Centre Doctoral Award. His dissertation, “Red  October: Left-Indigenous Struggles in Modern Bolivia,” was nominated by the Department of Political Science for the John Leyelr-CIFAR Prize for Interdisciplinary Research, as  well as the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies  (CAGS/UMI) Distinguished Dissertation Award.

 

Research

Research Interests:

Over the last decade, Webber has developed a wide-ranging and ambitious research agenda which coheres around an ensemble of overlapping interests in Latin American politics and international development studies.

His first book, Red October: Left-Indigenous Struggles in Modern Bolivia, was published in 2011. It is a revised and expanded version of his doctoral dissertation, which begins in 1781 and traces the oppositional cultures of indigenous rebellion and working-class formation against a backdrop of capitalist development, Bolivia’s insertion into the world market, and contested state formation. This long historical sociological narrative is combined with archival work, techniques of oral history, and ethnography to provide an account of the combined oppositional consciousness at the heart of the left-indigenous cycle of revolt that shook the country between 2000 and 2005. According to historian Greg Grandin, Red October “provides an invaluable guide to our generation’s 1848: Bolivia’s resource wars of the early twenty-first century, when indigenous and union activists joined together to take back their country’s water and gas from foreign corporations – and in so doing, led the first sustained and successful assault on neoliberalism.”

Webber’s second book, From Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia: Class Struggle, Indigenous Liberation, and the Politics of Evo Morales, also published in 2011, interrogates the economics and politics of racialized class restructuring in Bolivia since Evo Morales was elected as the first indigenous president of the country in 2005. Geographer David Harvey discusses From Rebellion to Reform at length in his recent book, Rebel Cities, describing it as “excellent.”

As lead editor of a third book, published in 2013, The New Latin American Left: Cracks in the Empire, Webber worked closely with the leading historian of the Left in modern Mexico and Cuba, Barry Carr.

Crisis and Contradiction: Marxist Perspectives on Latin America in the Global Political Economy is his fourth book, a co-edited volume with political economist Susan Spronk of the University of Ottawa. It was published in 2015. This collection brings together leading economists and sociologists from Latin America, Europe, and North America.

A fifth book, co-authored with Todd Gordon of Wilfrid Laurier University, Brantford, was published in 2016. Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America is rooted in thousands of pages of Access to Information documents and dozens of interviews – carried out in Honduras, Guatemala, Venezuela, Ecuador and Bolivia – this book is a critical study of contemporary Canadian intervention in Latin America. It integrates political economy with theories of development and social movements to interrogate the insertion of Canadian multinational corporations (MNCs) into Latin America, the role of the Canadian state in facilitating this process, and the impact of these interconnected dynamics on the region’s people and ecology. Canadian-based MNCs, backed by the Canadian state through a coherent framework of trade, diplomacy, development aid, and security policy, have developed extensive economic interests in Latin America over the last two decades, particularly in mining and finance. Noam Chomsky describes Blood of Extraction as a “careful and comprehensive analysis of Canada’s economic policies and political interference in Latin America.”

Webber’s sixth book, The Last Day of Oppression, and the First Day of the Same: The Politics and Economics of the New Latin American Left, published in 2017, explains the political dynamics and conflicts underpinning the contradictory evolution of left-wing governments and social movements in Latin America in the last two decades. Throughout the 2000s, Latin America transformed itself into the leading edge of anti-neoliberal resistance in the world. What is left of the Pink Tide today? What is the governments’ relationship to the explosive social movements that propelled them to power? As China's demand slackens for Latin American commodities, will they continue to rely on natural resource extraction? Webber grounds the study in an analysis of trends in capitalist accumulation from 1990 to 2016, in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Venezuela. The book explains inequality there today through a decolonial Marxist framework, rooted in a new understanding of class and its complex associations with racial and gender oppression. He also discusses indigenous and peasant resistance to the expansion of private mining, agro-industry and natural gas and oil activities. The book concludes with chapters on “passive revolution” in Bolivia under Evo Morales and debates around dual power and class composition during the era of Hugo Chávez in Venezuela. Here is Andreas Malm, author of award-winning Fossil Capital, on The Last Day of Oppression: “Weaving together GDP data and traditions of anticolonial resistance, individual biographies and debates in Marxist theory, always with a pulse of street movements running through the text, this is concrete analysis of the conjuncture as it should be done.” For Jeff Goodwin of NYU, it is “simply the best book we have on the rise and current crisis of the new Latin American Left. It’s also a model for how to analyse contentious politics.” Michael Löwy calls the book’s theoretical framework “brilliant.”

While working on these major research initiatives, Webber also wrote dozens of articles for leading journals, including Theory and Society, Journal of Agrarian Change, Third World Quarterly, New Left Review, Latin American Research Review, Latin American Perspectives, Latin American Politics and Society, Bulletin of Latin American Research, Historical Materialism, Critical Sociology, Review of Radical Political Economics, and Rethinking Marxism, among others.

Webber’s popular writing appears regularly in Jacobin and Viewpoint.

At present, he is pursuing four main research projects.

The first, a book, is entitled Andean Labyrinth: Accumulation, Conflict, and Power in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela. This work explores what Webber calls the combined liberation struggle unfolding in the contemporary Andes – the dynamic of social movements struggling simultaneously against the political economy of class exploitation under neoliberalism and the various forms of racist oppression embedded within a persistent “coloniality of power.” Andean Labyrinth demonstrates how the historical development of capitalism and state formation in the Andes has been a deeply racialized process, as well as how this historical backdrop has informed the New Left’s combined emancipatory aims across the spheres of racial oppression and class exploitation. This project is rooted in interviews carried out over several years, together with extensive archival research.

The second project, also a monograph, is entitled Protest and Power in the Making of Modern Latin America: Capitalist Development and Social Movements, 1880s-2020s. The aim of this project is to combine the study of social movements and the political economy of uneven capitalist development to better understand the origins and trajectory of modern forms of political rule and resistance in Latin America. Shifting between a panoramic perspective of region-wide labour movements and guerrilla insurgencies, and close-up, fine-grained case studies, it will analyse the dominant repertoires of contentious politics across six distinct regional cycles of accumulation from the late-nineteenth to early-twenty-first centuries. The project will trace the major shifts in rural and urban class structures across these six periods in order to establish their implications for patterns of economic development and dominant political regime types. The project analyses how these changing class structures both facilitated certain forms of contentious politics and closed down others. The research also explores the ways in which activists understood the objective conditions they were thrust into involuntarily, their everyday experiences, the ideas they drew upon, and the circulation of those ideas across national boundaries.

The third initiative is a short book project, Impasse in Latin America: Making Sense of the Latin America Left, to be co-authored with Franck Gaudichaud and Massimo Modonesi.

The fourth project is a co-authored book with Todd Gordon on the contemporary dynamics of imperialism within a complexly stratified world system.

Examples of research funding:

2017 Errol Sharpe Book Prize

Dissertation, Red October: Left-Indigenous Struggle in Bolivia, 2000-2005, nominated by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto, for the John Leyerle-CIFAR Prize for Interdisciplinary Research and the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS/UMI) Distinguished Dissertation Award

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Post-Doctoral Fellowship, 2009-2011 – (declined in order to accept tenure-track position at the University of Regina)

Society for Socialist Studies, Travel Grant 2008

Ontario Graduate Scholarship 2006-2007

Ontario Graduate Scholarship 2005-2006 (Thomas and Beverly Simpson OGS Award)

International Development Research Centre Doctoral Award 2005-2006

University of Toronto Fellowship, 2002-2007

School of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto, Travel Grant, 2006

Sir Val Duncan Travel Grant, Munk Centre for International Studies, 2004-2005

Publications

Works Submitted or in Progress

Book Manuscript, Andean Labyrinth: Accumulation, Conflict, and Power in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela, - Writing Stage.

Article, “Complex Stratification in the World System: Capitalist Totality and Geopolitical Fragmentation” (co-authored with Todd Gordon) – under review.

Article, “Canadian Capital and Secondary Imperialism” (co-authored with Todd Gordon) – under review.

Article, “From Nuestra América to Abya Yala: Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism in Latin America Across Centuries” – under review.

Books:

The Last Day of Oppression, and the First Day of the Same: The Politics and Economics of the New Latin American Left, Chicago: Haymarket and London: Pluto, 2017.

Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America. (Co-author with Todd Gordon), Halifax: Fernwood, 2016. *Winner of the 2017 Errol Sharpe Book Prize

Crisis and Contradiction: Marxist Perspectives on Latin America in the Global Political Economy (Co-editor with Susan Spronk), Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, Historical Materialism Book Series, 2015.

The New Latin American Left: Cracks in the Empire (Co-editor with Barry Carr) Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2013.

Red October: Left-Indigenous Struggles in Modern Bolivia, Historical Materialism Book Series, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2011.

From Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia: Class Struggle, Indigenous Liberation, and the Politics of Evo Morales, 2000-2010. Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2011.

Edited Journal Special Issues                

(1) Symposium on Glen Coulthard’s Red Skins, White Masks, in Historical Materialism (Editor and author of introduction), 24,3, 2016.

(2) “The Bolivarian Process in Venezuela: A Left Forum,” Historical Materialism (Co-editor with Susan Spronk), 19,1: 229-266, 2011.

Journal Articles

2017

“Contemporary Latin American Inequality: Class Struggle, Decolonization, and the Limits of Liberal Citizenship,” Latin American Research Review, forthcoming 52,1, 2017.

“Evo Morales, Transformismo, and the Consolidation of Agrarian Capitalism in Bolivia, 2006-2016,” Journal of Agrarian Change, 17, 2: 330-347, 2017.

“Evo Morales, el transformismmo y la consolidación del capitalismo agrario en Bolivia,” Cuestión Agraria, No. 2, 2017.

“Social Theory from the South,” New Left Review, II, 103 (Jan-Feb): 151-160, 2017.

2016

“Evo Morales and the Political Economy of Passive Revolution in Bolivia, 2006-2015,” Third World Quarterly, 37, 10: 1855-1876, 2016.

“Idle No More: An Introduction to the Symposium on Glen Coulthard’s Red Skin, White Masks,” Historical Materialism, 24, 3: 3-29, 2016.

2015

“The Indigenous Community as ‘Living Organism’: José Carlos Mariátegui, Romantic Marxism, and Extractive Capitalism in the Andes,” Theory and Society, 44, 6: 575-598, 2015.

“Hypotheses on Hope,” Radical Philosophy, 192: 48-51, 2015.

“Teatro Político en Bolivia,” Herramienta, 56: 41-51, 2015.

“Burdens of a State Manager,” Viewpoint, February 25, 2015.

“Dual Powers, Class Compositions, and the Venezuelan People,” Historical Materialism, 23, 2: 189-227, 2015.

“Rebel Dawn,” New Left Review, II, 91 (January-February): 149-160, 2015.

“New Forms, Old Problems,” Radical Philosophy, 190 (March-April): 43-46, 2015.

2014

Evo Morales and the MST in Bolivia: Continuities and Discontinuities in Agrarian Reform,” (co-authored with Honor Brabazon), Journal of Agrarian Change, 14, 3: 435-465, 2014.

Canadian Geopolitics in Post-Coup Honduras,” (co-authored with Todd Gordon), Critical Sociology, 40, 4: 601-620, 2014.

Sabaneta to Miraflores: The Afterlives of Hugo Chávez in Venezuela,” (co-authored with Susan Spronk), New Politics, 14, 4: 97-109, 2014.

2013

Post-Coup Honduras: Latin America’s Corridor of Reaction,” (co-authored with Todd Gordon), Historical Materialism, 21, 3: 16-56, 2013.

On the Fortieth Anniversary of Latin American Perspectives,” Latin American Perspectives, 40, 6: 71-113, 2013.

2012

Popular Movements, Political Economy, and the State in Bolivia: An Interview with Oscar Olivera and Freddy Villagómez,” Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, 23.3: 6-19, 2012.

2011

Canada and the Honduran Coup of June 2009,” Bulletin of Latin American Research, (co-authored with Todd Gordon), 30.3: 328-343, 2011.

A New Indigenous-Left in Ecuador?NACLA Report on the Americas, (September-October), 2011: 9-13.

2010

“Bolivia in the Era of Morales,” (review essay) Latin American Research Review 45.3: 248-260, 2010.

“Neostructuralism, Neoliberalism, and Latin America’s Resurgent Left,” Historical Materialism 18.3: 208-229, 2010.

“Carlos Mesa, Evo Morales, and a Divided Bolivia, 2003-2005,” Latin American Perspectives, 37.3 (May): 51-70, 2010.

“Venezuela Under Chávez: The Prospects and Limitations of Twenty-First Century Socialism, 1998-2009,” Socialist Studies/Études Socialistes, 6, 1 (Spring): 11-44, 2010.

2008

“Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia (Part III): Neoliberal Continuities, the Autonomist Right, and the Political Economy of Indigenous Struggle,” Historical Materialism 16.4: 67-109, 2008. 

“Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia (Part II): Revolutionary Epoch, Combined Liberation, and Electoralism,” Historical Materialism 16.3: 1-22, 2008.

“Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia (Part I): Domestic Class Structures, Latin American Trends, and Capitalist Imperialism,” Historical Materialism 16.2: 23-58, 2008.

“Imperialism and Resistance: Canadian Mining Companies in Latin America,” Third World Quarterly 29,1: 63-87. (Co-authored with Todd Gordon), 2008.

“Dynamite in the Mines and Bloody Urban Clashes: Indigenous Ascendant Populism and the Limits of Reform in Bolivia’s Movement Towards Socialism,” Socialist Studies/Etudes Socialistes 4, 1: 79-117, 2008.

 “Marxism and Development Theory: Recent Scholarship on the Third World,” in Rethinking Marxism 20,1: 162-176, 2008.

2007

“Struggles against Accumulation by Dispossession in Bolivia: The Political Economy of Natural Resource Contention,” Latin American Perspectives 34,2: 31-47 (Co-authored with Susan Spronk), 2007. 

 “Indigenous Struggle in Latin America: The Perilous Invisibility of Capital and Class,” Latin American Politics and Society 49,3: 191-205, 2007.

2006

“Imperialism without Colonies,” Review of Radical Political Economics 38,1: 139-143, 2006.

2005

“Left-Indigenous Struggles in Bolivia: Searching for Revolutionary Democracy,” Monthly Review 57, 4: 34-48, 2005.

Book Chapters

2018

“Podemos and Latin America,” (with Salvador Schavelzon) in Óscar García Agustín and Marco Briziarelli, eds., Podemos and the New Political Cycle: Left-Wing Populism and Anti-Establishment Politics. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

“Marxism and Social Movements,” in Beverley Skeggs, Sara R. Farris, and Alberto Toscano, eds., Handbook of Marxism, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

“Bolivia’s Cycle of Revolt,” in Colin Barker, Gareth Dale, and Neil Davidson, eds., Revolutionary Rehearsals, Chicago: Haymarket, 2018.

2016

“‘The Last Day of Oppression, and the First Day of the Same’: Popular Forces Regroup Against Rafael Correa in Ecuador,” in Sara Farris and Joost Kircz, eds., Returns of Marxism. Chicago: Haymarket, 2016.

2015

“Crisis and Class, Advance and Retreat: The Political Economy of the New Latin American Left,” in Lucia Pradella and Thomas Marois, eds., Polarizing Development: Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis, London: Pluto, 2015.

“Systemic Logics and Historical Specificity: Renewing Historical Materialism in Latin American Political Economy,” (co-authored with Susan Spronk) in Susan Spronk and Jeffery R. Webber, eds., Crisis and Contradiction: Marxist Perspectives on Latin America in the Global Economy, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, Historical Materialism Books Series, 2015.

“Revolution against ‘Progress’: Neo-Extractivism, the Compensatory State, and the TIPNIS Conflict in Bolivia,” in Susan Spronk and Jeffery R. Webber, eds., Crisis and Contradiction: Marxist Perspectives on Latin America in the Global Economy, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, Historical Materialism Books Series, 2015.

2014

"The Last Day of Oppression, and the First Day of the Same": Popular Forces Regroup against Rafael Correa in Ecuador. In Returns of Marxism. Editors: Farris S, Kircz J. International Institute for Research and Education, Amsterdam 2014.

Crisis and Class, Advance and Retreat: The Political Economy of the New Latin American Left. In Polarizing Development: Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis. Editors: Marois T, Pradella L. 157-168. Pluto, London 2014.

Revolution against "Progress": Neo-Extractivism, the Compensatory State, and the TIPNIS Conflict in Bolivia. In Crisis and Contradiction: Marxist Perspectives on Latin America in the Global Economy. Editors: Spronk S, Webber JR. Brill, Leiden 2014.

Systemic Logics and Historical Specificity: Renewing Historical Materialism in Latin American Political Economy. In Crisis and Contradiction: Marxist Perspectives on Latin America in the Global Economy. Editors: Spronk S, Webber JR. Brill, Leiden 2014.

2013

“Indigenous Liberation and Class Struggle in Ecuador: A Conversation with Luis Macas,” in Clifton Ross and Marcy Rein, eds.,  Until the Rulers Obey: Voices from Latin American Social Movement, Oakland: PM Press, 2013.

“Ecuador’s Economy under Rafael Correa: Twenty-First Century Socialism or a New Extracivism? An Interview with Alberto Acosta,” in Clifton Ross and Marcy Rein, eds., Until the Rulers Obey: Voices from Latin American Social Movements, Oakland: PM Press, 2013.

“The Latin American Left in Theory and Practice,” (co-authored with Barry Carr) in Jeffery R. Webber and Barry Carr, eds., The New Latin American Left: Cracks in the Empire. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2013.

“From Left-Indigenous Insurrection to Reconstituted Neoliberalism in Bolivia: Political Economy, Indigenous Liberation, and Class Struggle, 2000-2011,” in Jeffery R. Webber and Barry Carr, eds., The New Latin American Left: Cracks in the Empire. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2013.

“The Overthrow of a Moderate and the Birth of a Radicalizing Resistance: The Coup against Manuel Zelaya and the History of Imperialism and Popular Struggle in Honduras,” (co-authored with Todd Gordon) in Jeffery R. Webber and Barry Carr, eds., The New Latin American Left: Cracks in the Empire. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2013.

2012

“Capitalism,” in Andrew Boyd, ed., Beautiful Trouble: A Toolbox for the Next Revolution, New York: OR Books, 2012.

“Hope and Contradiction: The Struggle for Socialism in Twenty-First Century Venezuela,” in Henry Veltmeyer, ed., Twenty-First Century Socialism, 2011.

2010

“Socialism and Development,” in Henry Veltmeyer et. al., eds., Critical Development Studies: Tools for Progressive Change. London: Pluto, 2010.

“Struggle, Continuity, and Contradiction in Bolivia,” in Peter Gärtner, Sven Schaller and Muruchi Poma, eds., Bolivien im Umbruch. Der schwierige Weg zur Neugründung. [A German translation of my recent essay of the same name in International Socialism], 2010.

2009

“From Naked Barbarism to Barbarism with Benefits: Neoliberal Capitalism, Natural Gas Policy, and the Government of Evo Morales in Bolivia,” in Arne Ruckert and Laura Macdonald, eds., Post-Neoliberalism in the Americas? New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.

“Left-Indigenous Politics in Bolivia: Evo Morales and the Constituent Assembly,” in Yildiz Atasoy, ed., Hegemonic Transitions, the State, and Neoliberal Crisis in Capitalism. London and New York: Routledge, 2009.

2008

“Image and Reality in Bolivia: The Contradictions of Evo Morales and the New Indigenous Left,” in Aylin Topal, ed., The Latin American Left. Istanbul: Yordam Kitap (Exclusively in Turkish), 2008.

“Struggles against Accumulation by Dispossession in Bolivia: The Political Economy of Natural Resource Contention,” in Harry Vanden, Richard Stahler-Sholk, and Glen Kuecker, eds., Twenty-First Century Latin American Social Movements. Boulder, CO: Rowman and Littlefield. (Co-authored with Susan Spronk) Re-print of Latin American Perspectives article, 2008. [Book was selected as one of Choice Outstanding Academic Titles for 2009]

Recent Popular Writing

“Down, But Not Out,” Jacobin, Issue 25, Spring 2017.

“Assessing the Pink Tide,” Jacobin, April 11, 2017.

“Avialando a Maré Rosa”, Choldraboldra, April 11, 2017.

“Profits, Coercion, and Resistance: An Introduction to the Symposium on Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America,” (with Todd Gordon), in “The Ottawa Connection: A Symposium on Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America,” Briarpatch, February 2017.

“Response,” (with Todd Gordon), in “The Ottawa Connection: A Symposium on Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America,” Briarpatch, February 2017.

“Canada’s Hemisphere,” (co-authored with Todd Gordon), Jacobin, December 29, 2016.

“Wat is er aan de hand in Venezuela?” Grenzeloos, December 3, 2016.

“Gordon y Webber: <<Justin Trudeau no ha hecho nada para cambian el accionar pernicioso de las transnacionales canadienses>>,” Nueva Sociedad, Web edition, November 2016.

“Life After Dilma,” Jacobin, May 11, 2016.

“Ecuador’s Impasse,” Jacobin, August 30, 2015.

“En el impasse politico,” Viento Sur, September 20, 2015.

“L’impasse équatorienne,” Contretemps-Web, December 18, 2015.

“Cracks in Correísmo,” (with Alejandra Santillana Ortíz), Jacobin, August 14, 2015.

“E.P. Thompson’s Romantic Marxism,” Jacobin, July 24, 2015.

“Managing Bolivian Capitalism,” Jacobin, 13: 45-55, 2014.

“The Gangs of Guatemala,” Los Angeles Review of Books, May 21, 2014.

“Honduran Labyrinth,” (co-athored with Todd Gordon), Jacobin, Issue 10, 2013.

 

PhD Supervision

I am interested in supervising doctoral theses in the following areas: Political Economy of Latin America; Latin American Left; Latin American Social Movements; Latin American Marxism (Theory, History, Practice); Political Economy of Development; Imperialism, Hegemony, Empire and Globalization; Historical Sociology and Historical Materialism; Marxist Theory.

Current PhD Student(s):

PhD First Supervisor

Angus McNelly, “The Relations Between the State and Social Movements under the MAS Government in Bolivia” – ESRC funded (2014-2018)

Kyla Sankey, “Land, Agrarian Transformations and New Peasant Movements in Colombia,” (2014-2018)

Kristin Ciupa, “The Struggle Continues: Oil, Class Conflict and the State in Venezuela from 1999 to 2016” SSHRC (Canada) funded (2013-2017)

PhD Second Supervisor

Sue A.S. Iamamoto, “Relationship between Warfare and Nationalism in Bolivia,” PhD, Queen Mary University of London, Second Supervisor (First supervisor, James Dunkerley), (2011-2015)

María Isabel Díaz Hernández, “The Politics of Human Rights in Contemporary Mexico” (First supervisor, James Dunkerley), (2014-)

Supervision of over a dozen Masters theses to successful completion

Public Engagement

Webber is happy to respond to media requests to speak about ongoing development in Latin American politics.

Committee Member

Centre on Labour and Global Production (CLGP), Queen Mary University of London (2017-)

London Latin American Marxist Reading Group (2015-)

Organizing Committee of Annual Historical Materialism Conference in London (2008-)

London Seminar on Contemporary Marxist Theory (2012 – 2013)

Centre for Ethics and Politics, Queen Mary University of London (September 2012 – 2015)

Historical Materialism and World Development Working Group (2012-)

Editorial Board Member

Historical Materialism (2008 – )

Latin American Perspectives Participating Editor (September 2008- )

Capitalism, Nature, Socialism (2008-)

Journal Referee

Antipode; Canadian Journal of Development Studies; Capital and Class; City and Society; Colombia Internacional; Comparative Politics; Competition and Change: The Journal of Global Business and Political Economy; Critical Sociology; Culture, Theory and Critique; Development and Change; Environment and Planning D: Society and Space; Geoforum; Globalizations; Historical Materialism; Interface: A Journal for and about Social Movements; International Labor and Working-Class History; International Political Sociology; Journal of Iberian and Latin American Research; Journal of Latin American Studies; Journal of Rural Studies; Latin American Perspectives; Latin American Politics and Society; Latin American Research Review; Nationalism and Ethnic Politics; Political Studies; The Latin Americanist; Third World Quarterly

Book Referee

Arizona University Press; Brill (Historical Materialism Book Series); Haymarket; Oxford University Press;  Palgrave Macmillan; Pluto; Rowman and Littlefield; Verso; Zed Books; Routledge (Globalizations Book Series)

Grant Referee

Social Science and Humanities Research Council – SSHRC (Canada)

Economic and Social Research Council – ESRC (UK)

Member

Society for Latin American Studies – UK (SLAS); British International Studies Association; Latin American Studies Association (LASA); Canadian Political Science Association (CPSA); International Studies Association (ISA); Canadian Association for the Study of International Development (CASID)

Media

Regular contributor to Jacobin and Viewpoint.  

Interviewed for and/or featured in Wall Street Journal, Semana (Major Colombian weekly magazine), Le Monde Diplomatique, World Politics Review, BBC Radio, KPFA Radio in San Francisco, The Dominion, CHRY Community Radio in Toronto, CBC Radio, CTV National News, CBC TV: The National, Regina Leader-Post, Briarpatch, Vancouver Coop Radio, Radio Libertad in Bolivia, CKLN Radio in Toronto. 

Selected Academic Presentations                                   

2017

“The Time of Ploughmen, and the Time of Manure: Defeat and Renewal on the Latin American Left,” at The Will of the People? Revolutionary Legacies, Reactionary Manipulations, Kingston University, London, June 1-2, 2017.

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). Canadian Political Science Association (CPSA) Annual Conference, Ryerson University, Toronto, May 31, 2017.

“Minería canadiense en América Latina,” (with Todd Gordon), Seminario latinoamericano de ecología política: Saberes ambientales en defensa de la vida, Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México (UACM), May 17-18, 2017.

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). Lecture Series, Canadian Studies Programme, Institute of the Americas, University College London, London, UK, March 27, 2017.

Invited roundtable with author. The Last Day of Oppression, and the First Day of the Same: The Politics and Economics of the New Latin American Left

  • Institute of the Americas, University College London, London, UK, March 7, 2017.
  • Department of Sociology, University of California at Berkeley. Department, Colloquia. February 5, 2017.
  • Center for Research on Latin America, University of Pittsburgh, Lecture Series. February 9, 2017.
  • Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University, Lecture Series. February 13, 2017.
  • David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University, Lecture Series, February 15, 2017.
  • Center for Latin American Studies, New York University, Co-Sponsored by NACLA Report on the Americas, Lecture Series, February 16, 2017.
  • A three-part lecture series. Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City. February 19-26, 2017.

 

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). Lecture Series, Department of History, Philosophy, and Politics, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops. February 2, 2017.

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). Mining Justice Alliance and Social Justice Studies at the University of Victoria, Victoria. January 25, 2017.

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). Law Student Society Seminar Series, Peter A. Allard School of Law, University of British Colombia, Vancouver. January 24, 2017.

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). People’s Co-op Bookstore, co-sponsored by Mining Justice Alliance, Vancouver. January 24, 2017.

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). Global Friday Series and the Department of Geography, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George. January 20, 2017.

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). Seminar Series of the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean, York University, Toronto. January 18, 2017.

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). The Steady Café and Bar, Toronto. Sponsored by Another Story bookstore. January 17, 2017.

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). McGill University, Montreal. Co-Sponsored by Critical Social Theory at McGill and the McGill Research group Investigating Canadian Mining in Latin America. January 12, 2017.

Roundtable book discussion. The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon). Life of Pie, Ottawa. Co-Sponsored by Octopus Books and Mining Watch. January 11, 2017.

2016

Discussant at Book Launch. Provincializing Nature: Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Politics of the Environment in Latin America, edited by Michela Coletta and Malayna Raftopoulos (London: ILAS), 2016. Senate House, Institute of Latin American Studies, Monday 21 November, 2016.

Rountable Book Discussion with David McNally and Leandro Vergara-Camus: The Blood of Extraction: Canadian Imperialism in Latin America (co-authored with Todd Gordon), Thirteenth Annual Conference of Historical Materialism: Limits, Barriers and Borders, SOAS, London, November 10-13, 2016.

“The End of the Cycle? The Decline of Latin America’s ‘Pink Tide’,” Thirteenth Annual Conference of Historical Materialism: Limits, Barriers and Borders, SOAS, London, November 10-13, 2016.

“Contested Production of Nature in Bolivia: Agrarian Reform, Extraction, and Environment-Making under Evo Morales,” XXXIV International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), New York, NY, Hilton, May 27-30, 2016.

2015

Roundtable Book Discussion with Susan Spronk, Crisis and Contradiction: Marxist Perspectives on Latin America in the Global Political Economy, Twelfth Annual Conference of Historical Materialism: The Old is Dying, the New Cannot be Born – States, Strategies, Socialisms, SOAS, London, 5-8 November, 2015.

“Andean Labyrinth: Passive Revolution in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela,” Twelfth Annual Conference of Historical Materialism: Austerity and Socialist Strategy, SOAS, London, 5-8 November, 2015.

“Latin America in the Twenty-First Century: State Forms, Social Power, and Permutations of Capital,” Paper presented at one-day conference – State Capture: Elites, Legality and Access to Power, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, October 7, 2015.

Invited participant in two-week summer conference at the Centro Nacional de Estrategía para el Derecho al Territorio (CENEDET), a research institute led by David Harvey and based in Quito, Ecuador, 1-14 August 2015.

‘Contemporary Latin American Inequality: Class Struggle, Decolonization, and the Limits of Liberal Citizenship,’ Paper presenter at Feature Session, hosted by the journal Latin American Research Review, at the 33rd Annual International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 27-30 May 2015.

“The Left and Resource Extraction in Latin America: From Commodity Boom to the Age of Austerity?” Keynote Address, Conference: Social-Environmental Conflicts and Human Rights in Latin America, Human Rights Consortium, School of Advanced Study, University of London, March 24, 2015.

“The New Dispossession: Theories of Contemporary Imperialism,” Latin American Anthropology Series, Crises and Ideologies of Domination, Institute of Latin American Studies, Senate House, March 5, 2015.

“The Political Economy of Bolivia Since 2006,’ 2015 Lecture Series of the Anglo-Bolivian Society, Institute of Latin American Studies, Senate House, January 29, 2015.

“Latin American Theories of the New Imperialism,” London Latin American Seminar Series, Institute of Latin American Studies, Senate House, January 15, 2015.

2014

“Andean Labyrinth: The New Left in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela,” Development Studies Seminar Series, SOAS, University of London, November 11, 2014.

“Passive Revolution in the Andes: The New Left in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela,” at How Capitalism Survives - Eleventh Annual Historical Materialism London Conference, Vernon Square, London, UK, November 6-9, 2014.

Participant in Book launch, Lucia Pradella and Thomas Marois, eds., Polarizing Development: Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis, at How Capitalism Survives - Eleventh Annual Historical Materialism London Conference, Vernon Square, London, UK, November 6-9, 2014.

Participant in Roundtable Discussion of Colin Mooers’ Imperial Subjects: Citizenship in an Age of Crisis and Empire, at How Capitalism Survives - Eleventh Annual Historical Materialism London Conference, Vernon Square, London, UK, November 6-9, 2014.

Discussant at Book Launch: Leandro Vergara-Camus, Land and Freedom: The MST, the Zapatistas and Peasant Alternatives to Neoliberalism, Development Studies Seminar Series, SOAS, University of London, October 7, 2014.

“Haunted by the Legend of Better Days: Romantic Marxism and Extractive Capitalism in the Andes,” Crisis and Social Change: Towards Alternative Horizons, Conference organized by the Department of Sociology, Cambridge University, UK, September 26-27, 2014.

“Evo Morales and the Political Economy of Extractive Capitalism in Bolivia, 2006-2014,” The Crisis: Scholarship, Policies, Conflicts and Alternatives, 2014 International Initiative for the Promotion of Political Economy (IIPPE) Annual Conference, Naples, Italy, September 16-18, 2014.

“Crisis and Class, Advance and Retreat: The Political Economy of the New Latin American Left,” British International Studies Association (BISA) Annual Conference, Dublin, Ireland, June 18-20, 2014.

“Managing Bolivian Capitalism,” Confronting Crisis: Left Praxis in the Face of Austerity, War and Revolution, Historical Materialism Conference, York University, Toronto, Canada, May 8-11, 2014.

Participant in Roundtable, “Imperialism, War, Colonialism, and Decolonization,” Recompositions of the Left: A Historical Materialism Pre-Conference Workshop, York University, Toronto, Canada, May 7-8, 2014.

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